Princeton University’s Spencer Trask Lectures: Pasquale Scaturro

Pasquale Scaturro’s talk precedes the opening of “To the Mountains of the Moon: Mapping African Exploration, 1541-1880″ a map exhibition of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections in Firestone Library, to which all are welcome. Pasquale Scaturro, geophysicist, adventurer, and expedition leader is one of the most successful and accomplished mountain and river expedition leaders in the world and has been exploring the far reaches of the planet for over 25 years. He is founder and president of…

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Princeton University’s Spencer Trask Lectures: Joan Breton Connelly

The visual culture of ancient Greece has left a record rich with information on the active role of women in the organization and functioning of cult. Connelly draws upon images from vase painting, portrait sculpture, votive reliefs, and funerary monuments to bring to life the movement of women within ritual space. Considering this material in the context of what we know from texts and inscriptions, she argues a wider visibility for women across the polis landscape than has previously been…

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Princeton University’s Spencer Trask Lectures: Sir Tim Berners-Lee

Fifteen years after the launch of the World Wide Web and five years after the start of the Semantic Web, the web of documents is well deployed and work on the web of data is taking off steadily. This talk will discuss the challenges and deployment paths, as well as the the Semantic Web concepts and progress to date. Tim Berners-Lee is the director of the World Wide Web Consortium, senior researcher at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory,…

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Princeton University’s Spencer Trask Lectures: Paula Vogel

Paula Vogel’s play, How I Learned to Drive, received the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, the Lortel, Drama Desk, Outer Critics Circle and New York Drama Critics Awards for Best Play, and won her a second OBIE. It has been produced all over the world, and her screenplay has been in development for HBO. Her other plays include The Long Christmas Ride Home, The Mineola Twins, The Baltimore Waltz, Hot’N’Throbbing, Desdemona, And Baby Makes Seven, and The Oldest Profession. Ms.…

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Princeton University’s Spencer Trask Lectures: Robert W. Lucky

The technologies for high speed Internet access are racing ahead towards achieving gigabit speeds to the home, and hold the promise of a digital ubiquity in which any content can be delivered almost instantly on demand. However, the sociology, economics, and policies governing this capability are yet to be determined. What will fill these enormous pipes, who will own them, and what technologies will dominate? Perhaps most importantly, what will be the outcome of the escalating war between copyright owners…

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Princeton University’s Spencer Trask Lectures: Alan Wolfe

America’s Two Visions: The Good and the Great From the reactions to British rule during the colonial era to the administration of George W. Bush, Americans have argued over two competing visions of their sense of national purpose. Different from Europe, special in its destiny, virtuous in theory if not always in practice, some of our leading politicians and thinkers have argued that America should be as good as possible. National in outreach and global in ambition, others have argued…

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Princeton University’s Spencer Trask Lectures: Svante Pääbo

The study of DNA sequence differences within and between species opened new inroads to the understanding of the history of humans as a species. We have learned that we are remarkably similar to other individuals as well as to our closest primate relatives. To understand what makes us unique, both as individuals and as a species, we need to consider the genome as a mosaic of discrete segments, each with its own unique history and relatedness to other individuals, to…

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Princeton University’s Spencer Trask Lectures: Susan Estrich

At the dawn of the twenty-first century, women in America are richer, more educated, and more powerful than they’ve ever been. So why is it, Susan Estrich asks, that they account for a mere three percent of the nation’s top executives? Why are there only three women running Fortune 500 companies? A quick survey of politics, academia, law, medicine, and entertainment reveals similar troubling inequities. Twenty-five years ago, the women who were “firsts” were supposed to have blazed a trail.…

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